IEN is an alliance of Indigenous Peoples whose Shared Mission is to Protect the Sacredness of Earth Mother from contamination & exploitation by Respecting and Adhering to Indigenous Knowledge and Natural Law

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Campaigns ~ Issues ~ Actions

 

The Climate Justice Alliance (CJA) and Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN), along with other US-based members of the social, environmental and climate justice communities and global alliances have platforms calling for leaving 80% of the current totality of fossil fuel reserves under the ground and ocean in order to avoid global temperatures rising to no more than 1.5°C.

How will this transition away from fossil fuel extraction be organized within our respective communities?

What will the consequences be for people, our communities, humanity, ecosystems, habitat and all life?

Issues of climate and environmental injustice and equity cannot be avoided if such questions are to be addressed.

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Past Campaigns &

Direct Actions

 

DIVEST – Pipelines

 

PCM- 2017

 

Crisis In Ecuador

Drilling threatens to alter caribou migrations and lower birth rates, risking the Gwich’in way of life. Leasing the #ArcticRefuge for oil and gas development is simply wrong. We must #ProtectTheArctic >>> https://t.co/0uCBibudzu

BREAKING NEWS -- District Judge Alvin Turner, Jr. today issued his ruling, stating that Energy Transfer (#ETP) should stop work on 18 miles of the #BayouBridge pipeline in Louisiana's coastal zone until the company's permit from LA DNR can be reaffirmed. ✊🏽 #nobbp #stopetp

Stand with the Gwich’in to Defend Arctic Refuge! SIGN THIS PETITION NOW: https://t.co/liVLcKssEt

PROTECT THE ARCTIC!

SIGN THIS PETITION NOW: https://t.co/liVLcKssEt

Two tragic murders in the Peruvian Amazon are now being used as an excuse for xenophobia against the Shipibo.

Today the Shipibo march in defense of their culture & dignity, and we stand in solidarity with them: https://t.co/p2BdUD7g2b #SolidaridadShipibo

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HEADLINES ~ Campaign Updates ~ PRESS RELEASES

Dozens of Indigenous and Frontline Community Representatives Call for an End to Bank Financing of Extreme Fossil Fuels

Two story banner drop greets arriving Chase Bank shareholders in Plano, Texas as international delegation gathers to protest its funding of climate chaos and Indigenous rights abuses. #ShutDownChase

An open letter penned by the delegation to shareholders, spotlights JPMorgan Chase in particular because of the unique scale and seriousness of the consequences stemming from its funding choices. “Jamie Dimon opens his most recent shareholder letter by boasting that JPMorgan Chase has ‘helped communities large and small.’ He omits mention of the other side of the balance sheet – the harm that his bank has done to communities like ours through its fossil fuel financing,” reads the delegation in the open letter.

Native Leaders Bring Attention to Impact of Fossil Fuel Industry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Lower Brule, SD — Yesterday, May 4th, Indigenous leaders and allies began convening at the Rosebud Sioux Nation, just miles from the proposed Keystone XL pipeline route, to call attention to the disproportionately high numbers of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls across North America. The gathering calls attention to the connection between pipeline construction and violence against Native women and girls.

UN Permanent Forum 2018: Bears Ears Prayer Run Alliance Statement

Bear Ears Prayer Run Alliance with the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Victoria Corpuz-Tauli

I would like to thank the Special Rapporteur, for the opportunity to address Agenda Item 10: Human Rights, to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. I would like to take this moment to acknowledge your safety and wellbeing today. In spirit of the many generations of strong females, our voices will not be extinguished! The Creator positioned each and every one of us in these sacred places to create our sacred spaces.

We, the Bears Ears Prayer Run Alliance, an affiliate of the Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples, are a delegation from the Pueblo of Laguna, Acoma, Hopi, Navajo and Ute. We take this time to thank the Indigenous Peoples of this land for welcoming and allowing our visit. I would like to acknowledge the spirits of the Indigenous Peoples that came before us.

Judge Rejects Trump Administration Attempt to Delay Methane Rule

U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick said that the Interior Department’s delay is “untethered to evidence” that would support postponing the original methane regulation. The rule is back in effect for the time being pending a final ruling from the court.
Currently, oil and gas companies must meet the Rule’s requirements to prevent waste of federally and tribal owned natural gas which will also curtail air pollution and emissions.

“The judge’s ruling is another victory for Fort Berthold Protectors of Water & Earth Rights (POWER) against the Trump administration’s long failed attempt to allow operators to willfully pollute our air and waste a finite natural resource. These rules have been established over years of public input and we understand that this administration is willing to use any means necessary to eliminate them at the cost of our health and our environment. The Rule must stay in place to protect communities like mine,” said Lisa DeVille, President of Fort Berthold POWER.

Water Protectors to Paint Mural in Protest of Wells Fargo

As Wells Fargo Continues to Fund Oil and Gas Pipelines Indigenous, Environmental, and Climate Justice Groups Urge the Bank to Divest from Pipeline Companies

In December, 2017, Wells Fargo announced a $50 million grant to Native Americans for renewable energy & clean water programs, cultural awareness and language preservation projects, among other things. At around the same time, Wells Fargo agreed to extend two credit facilities totaling $1.5 billion for Canadian oil corporation, TransCanada, to build the Keystone XL pipeline. Many Native American communities have been directly impacted by fossil fuel development, extraction, and transportation.

Indigenous and Environmental Justice Groups Rally at US Bank Headquarters to Protest the Bank’s Investment in Pipeline Projects

Minneapolis, MN – Hundreds of Indigenous water protectors, concerned Minnesotans, and activists from around the country rallied today at the U.S. Bank Headquarters to demand that U.S. Bank uphold its promise to divest from oil and gas pipelines, including those by Energy Transfer Partners (ETP), the company behind the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The rally comes as U.S. Bank drives a massive public relations campaign surrounding the hosting of the Super Bowl at U.S. Bank stadium in Minneapolis. U.S. Bank is at the center of a growing campaign by indigenous, climate and community groups demanding it lives up to its own promises to stop financing fossil fuel projects.

Stop the Lumad Killings

The Lumad are indigenous people in the southern Mindanao region of the Philippines. The term Lumad is short for Katawhang Lumad (Literally: “indigenous people”), a description officially adopted by delegates of the Lumad Mindanao Peoples Federation founding assembly on June 26, 1986. This grew out of a political awakening among tribes during the martial law regime of President Marcos and reflects the collective identify of 18 Lumad ethnic groups. The assembly’s main objectives was to achieve self-determination and governance for their member-tribes within their ancestral domain in accordance with their culture and customary laws.

The Lumad have a traditional ancestral concept of land ownership which is communal private property. Community members have the right utilize any piece of unoccupied land within the communal territory. Lumad ancestral lands include rain forests, hunting grounds, cultivated and uncultivated land and valuable mineral resources (copper, nickel, gold, chromite, coal, gas, cement) below the land.

The GOP & Trump Administration’s Last Attack on Indigenous Rights of 2017

The Tax Reform Bill Opens the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge for Oil and Gas Drilling, Putting Alaskan Natives at Further Risk of Climate Disaster and Harms The Natural Resources They Depend On

Washington D.C. -Today the Republican House and Senate passed the Republican Tax Reform Bill, a bill that has seen unprecedented disapproval by American citizens. According to The Hill, “Public polling on the GOP’s tax overhaul indicates support hovering at less than 30 percent, which is even lower than the favorability toward ObamaCare when Democrats passed it in 2010”. In addition, every democrat from both chambers opposed the bill.

The primary goal of the bill is to cut taxes, but the bill will also repeal the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate and will open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Northern Alaska for oil and gas drilling.

Joint Statement on the US Army Corps of Engineers’ Approval of the Bayou Bridge Pipeline

Yesterday, December 14, 2017, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers granted permits to Bayou Bridge, LLC, a subsidiary of Energy Transfer Partners, to construct a 162.5-mile crude oil pipeline from Lake Charles to St. James, Louisiana. The Army Corps of Engineers refused to conduct a full Environmental Impact Statement for the project, despite pleas for such a study from communities directly impacted by the pipeline.

Cherri Foytlin, Bold Louisiana said: “To be honest, my hopes were never with the state and federal agencies who have consistently proven their lack of vision and scarcity of protection for the people and waters of this great state. The idea that this company, Energy Transfer Partners, who has destroyed land and water all over the United States, who carry the designation of “worst spill record,” who has created and maintained space for human rights abuses upon peaceful people – that they would be allowed to endanger over 700 of our waterways for their own profit is not only inconceivable, but proof of a moral bankruptcy within our systems of environmental protections. Yet, this is where we are. And while I am saddened by the news, I am equally sure that we will stand together as the mothers, fathers, sisters, and brothers, to peacefully endeavor to right the wrong of these misguided and foolish permittings.”

Indigenous Grassroots Activists Respond to the FCC Repealing Net Neutrality

Native nations, and Indigenous communities and organizations have used social media and internet-based communications as a means to highlight our struggles. Imagine the months at Standing Rock without live feeds or social media. The power of the world’s Indigenous Peoples coming together was made possible, in large part, by equal access to the internet. This decision could potentially harm our ability to organize as we depend on various websites to mobilize and to share our stories from the front lines. What’s more is that grassroots organizations often operate on small budgets. If fees become mandatory for the use of certain websites, grassroots organizations may struggle even more to operate. Our effort to build a sustainable and just society extends to all aspects of the commons, which includes the internet. We will stay committed to supporting the battle for net neutrality and digital civil rights.

Senators Warren, Merkley, and Udall Join the Gwich’in Indigenous Pray-In Against GOP Tax Bill

Washington, DC — Leaders from the Gwich’in Nation and Inupiaq Tribe traveled from northern Alaska and the Yukon Territory in Canada today to lead a pray in against the tax bill and urge Congress to drop drilling in the Arctic from the bill. Senator Elizabeth Warren, Senator Jeff Merkley, Senator Mark Udall, and Representative Alan Lowenthal all came out to support and joined the call to stop Arctic drilling.

The Gwich’in Nation of Alaska and Canada have always and will continue to subsist on the Porcupine Caribou herd, whose calving grounds are in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The place is vital for the survival of the Gwich’in and Inupiaq people. Today marked the 57th anniversary of the Refuge.

Trump Attacks Sacred Sites and Indigenous Rights By Lifting Protections From The Bears Ears National Monument

Salt Lake City, UT – On Monday, December 1st, during a brief visit to Utah, President Trump announced plans to shrink the Bears Ears and the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monuments in Utah. This is the largest removal of federal land protection in the nation’s history. In 2016, President Obama designated the Bears Ears region as a national monument, after five local tribes led a decade long campaigns to ensure the protection of these ancestral lands.

Shortly after Trump’s announcement, an inter-tribal coalition, comprised of the Ute Mountain Tribe, the Ute Indian Tribe, the Navajo Nation, the Hopi and the Zuni, filed the first lawsuit against the executive order on the basis that President Trump does not have the legal authority to remove the national monument protections.
Within the Bears Ears National Monument there are over 100,000 sacred sites and this region continues to provide cultural knowledge and value to the surrounding tribes. Indigenous Peoples still need these lands for ceremony, to harvest plants medicines, and to ensure that their traditions thrive. Secretary Ryan Zinke, Senator Orrin Hatch, and President Trump did not meet with tribal representatives to hear their arguments for maintaining the national monument, nor did they receive consent from these tribes to remove the protections. This is a direct violation of the nation to nation relationship that the federal government should maintain with sovereign tribal nations.

U.S. Senate Tax Bill Will Have Devastating Impacts on the Alaska Native Gwich’in Peoples’

Bemidji, MN – Before dawn on Saturday morning, December 2nd, the U.S. Senate passed a monumental tax overhaul with no Democratic support that overwhelmingly benefits corporations and the top 1%. The bill, written by a small panel of Republicans, behind closed doors was rushed to a vote, bypassing regular order that would have included hearings and committee meetings with both parties participating. In fact, the bill has ignited an outcry from Democrats, calling this process of the bill, “Washington at it’s worst”.

While the focus of criticism is centered on how the bill will not benefit a majority of taxpayers in the long term, there are immediate and potentially dire impacts within this bill for Indigenous Peoples that is being overlooked in the media. Two provisions inserted by Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) direct Sec. Zinke to approve at least two lease sales for drilling. Each would consist of no fewer than 400,000 acres and 2,000 acres (of the 800,000 total acres), known as 1002 Area, set aside for wells and support facilities within ANWR’s 1.5 million-acre coastal plain.

Rights Based Law for Systematic Change

It is time to stop thinking we must protect nature and recognize that as much as every other life form on Earth, we are nature. We cannot separate ourselves from the water we drink, the food we eat or the air we breathe any more than we can care for just a single leaf on a tree. And yet, human law almost everywhere defines “nature” as property to be owned, commodified and destroyed at will for human profit. Most of the destruction of the Earth is sanctioned by law—from blowing the tops of mountains for coal; to fracturing the earth for oil and natural gas; to clear cutting the Amazon and displacing Indigenous communities. In so doing we are defying Natural Law that governs the planet’s life systems. Climate disruption is the direct result of human activities pushing beyond the limits of Natural Law.

To avert the worst impacts of the climate crisis and move toward a planet in balance, we must challenge the idea that Earth’s living systems are property and change our legal frameworks to adhere to the natural laws of the Earth. Recognizing Rights of Nature means that human activities and development must not interfere with the ability of ecosystems to absorb their impacts, to regenerate their natural capacities, to thrive and evolve, and requires that those responsible for destruction, including corporate actors and governments be held fully accountable.

Nebraska Approves KXL Route: Indigenous Groups Respond

Lincoln, NE – Today, November 20, 2017, the Nebraska Public Service Commission (NPSC) announced their approval of the permit for the Keystone XL (KXL) Pipeline to cross through the state. Nebraska was one of the last strongholds in the fight to prevent KXL from being completed. This announcement comes just days after the KXL pipeline leaked 210,000 gallons of oil in South Dakota and after the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change COP23, where Indigenous Peoples from across the world have spent two weeks advocating to stop new oil development and to keep fossil fuels in the ground. In addition, today, November 20th, marks the anniversary of the night the US National Guard and North Dakota Law Enforcement used water cannons on peaceful protesters at Standing Rock in subzero temperatures to protect the interests of Energy Transfer Partners.

Even with this decision, TransCanada has an uphill battle moving forward. The NPSC rejected TransCanada’s preferred route, so TransCanada will have to go through a new planning process for new pumping stations, acquire new easements from landowners, and there’s an opportunity for pipeline fighters to demand a new environmental impact statement for the new route segments.

The Paris Agreement Does Not Recognize Indigenous Rights

November 17, 2017, The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 23rd Session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 23) has come to an end. And while progress has been made on the UNFCCC traditional knowledge Platform for engagement of local communities and Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Peoples’ rights are not fully recognized in the final platform document of COP 23. The burden of implementation falls on local communities and indigenous peoples.

Joye Braun on the Wakpa Waste Camp and the Fight to Stop the Keystone XL Pipeline

The water protectors camp, called the Wakpa Waste Camp, continues to stand in protection of water that threatens the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe including continuing to stand against the Dakota Access pipeline, and against the proposed Keystone XL pipeline. If built, the Keystone XL pipeline would would carry Tar Sands crude from Alberta and come within less than 1-mile of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe’s boundaries.

Last Real Indian’s editor Matt Remle recently spoke with veteran water protector Joye Braun about the Wakpa Waste camp and fight against the Keystone XL pipeline. For those who are unaware of the water protectors camp at Cheyenne River tell us more about the camp.

First Nations organizing leads to TransCanada Ending Its East Energy East Pipeline and Eastern Mainline proposals.

Energy East Project was a major concern for the safety of our waterways, fish, vegetation, animals plus our people who reside next to the Wolastoq (St. John river).

Please recognize this is a partial victory. We can celebrate our success here in the east coast although we need not overlook our Indigenous Sisters and Brothers in the west coast who must deal with the Kinder Morgan Pipeline that was authorized by the Trudeau government. Here in Wolastoq Homeland, we will continue to support the western Indigenous Nations as they resist the Kinder Morgan Pipeline.”

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